DJ and Steve Conger have been named the 2019 Pony Express Days Grand Marshals.

In 1999, only a few years after the city’s incorporation, DJ and Steve Conger moved from Washington state to Eagle Mountain City. Steve was seeking employment as a firefighter and began his service in the community as a fire volunteer. Consequently, DJ became involved in the Firefighter’s Auxiliary and was part of the original Pony Express Days Committee.

Twenty years later the Congers have built an impressive résumé of community involvement.

DJ has served in the schools as part of PTA/Community Councils, theater productions, and the Ballroom Dance Team. She has been employed for the past several years as a special education educator at the elementary, middle, and high school level. DJ has also been a Girl Scout leader.

“I’m excited to start work at Cedar Valley High School this year,” DJ said. “While I’ve enjoyed working at Westlake, my heart is in this valley. It’s where my kids are. Not just my own kids but all the kids I have worked with over the years.”

Steve spent 13 years with the Eagle Mountain City Fire Department and transitioned to employment with Unified Fire Authority when the city contracted with them six years ago. He was instrumental in establishing the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) and Community Safety Program and has taught numerous CPR, First Aid, and Babysitter Safety (assisted by DJ) classes. A Scoutmaster for the past decade, the Congers once taught 300 merit badge classes in one week.

“I think of myself as the friendly neighborhood fireman,” Steve said. “I’ve been around long enough that when I respond on calls, people often recognize me and being familiar with me brings a certain comfort level to them, which makes me happy.”

Through his experience as a firefighter/paramedic Steve saw a need to have a place in the city for loved ones who had died to be laid to rest close to home and asked to be part of the city’s new cemetery board. The Pony Express Memorial Cemetery was completed in 2014 and Steve continues to serve on the board and organizes the Memorial Day program each year.

The Congers enjoy supporting each other in all that they do and have raised three children in Eagle Mountain – Drew, 19, Jacob, 18, and Lucy, 14. They say they got involved in the community at first because the city was new and with such a small population they felt the need to know their neighbors. This developed into lasting friendships, and even as the city has grown, the small town feeling lingers, as so many people are new and come from a variety of places.

A fun way the Congers stay connected with the community is for the past 10 years they have constructed a pirate ship in their yard for Halloween and serve homemade donuts and root beer to visitors. In spite of the increased numbers who show up they have no immediate plans to stop this tradition at their beloved home.

Eagle Mountain City thanks DJ and Steve Conger for all they have contributed to the community and is honored to have them serve as this year’s Pony Express Days Grand Marshals.

 

 

EAGLE MOUNTAIN CITY (May 16, 2019) — Eagle Mountain City today announced Tyson Fresh Meats, a subsidiary of Tyson Foods, Inc., will invest almost $300 million to build a food production plant in the city. The facility will initially provide 800 jobs and is expected to expand to 1,200 positions within three years after opening.

 

The plant will be a case ready meat-cutting and packaging operation that converts fresh beef and pork, brought in from other locations, into steaks, chops, roasts and ground beef. The product is placed in trays, weighed and labeled, and then shipped to retailers for sale in grocery store meat cases.

 

“We welcome Tyson Fresh Meats to Eagle Mountain,” Mayor Tom Westmoreland said. “This facility will provide jobs for our community, allowing people to work closer to home. It will also bring needed infrastructure, especially roads that will provide better east/west connection to the Cedar Valley. Tyson Foods is the second Fortune 100 company to invest in our city and we look forward to a great community partnership.”

 

Tyson Fresh Meats is the beef and pork unit of Tyson Foods, Inc., one of the nation’s leading food companies. The business currently operates case ready plants in Iowa, Tennessee and Texas. Online video of the Texas facility can be accessed here. Starting wages for hourly employees at its existing facilities currently range from $14.40 to $16.50 per hour, with Tyson Foods offering health care benefits, 401(k) and the opportunity for advancement. Some skilled positions start at $20 per hour. Annual local payroll is projected at $44 million.

 

“We’re grateful for the invitation to come to Eagle Mountain and Utah County,” said Nate Hodne, senior vice president and general manager of case ready meats for Tyson Fresh Meats. “We’ve built some great relationships during the initial phases of this process, and we appreciate the strong support we’ve received from local leadership. Our team is excited to find upcoming opportunities to meet the people of Eagle Mountain and become a part of this vibrant community.”

The Utah Governor’s Office of Economic Development (GOED) previously announced the project would be locating in Utah, adding an estimated $27 million in new state tax revenue over the next 10 years. It is anticipated the project will have more than a $1 billion economic impact in the first ten years due to construction of the facility, salaries, taxable sales, and other investments in the local economy.

 

“It’s great to see Tyson Foods expand in Eagle Mountain,” said Val Hale, executive director of the Governor’s Office of Economic Development. “New jobs in that area will provide employment opportunities for many city residents who commute to work in the Utah and Salt Lake Valleys. Employment opportunities like this, closer to home, help reduce traffic congestion and improve air quality.”

 

Tyson Fresh Meats may earn up to 20 percent of the new state taxes they will pay over the 10-year life of the agreement in the form of a post-performance Economic Development Finance (EDIF) tax credit rebate. Each year Tyson meets the criteria in its contract with the state, the company will earn a portion of the total tax credit rebate.

 

Eagle Mountain City and Alpine School District have approved a Community Reinvestment Project Area for this project and the remaining taxing entities will consider the project for approval at upcoming meetings. The case ready plant will be located in the Pole Canyon development at the southwest end of Eagle Mountain City (see map attachment) and is expected to open as soon as 2021.

 

About Eagle Mountain City

Located in northern Utah County almost equidistant between the metro areas of Salt Lake City and Provo, Eagle Mountain City has grown from a population of 250 at its incorporation in 1996 to almost 40,000 today. Surrounded by natural beauty, the city offers many outdoor recreation opportunities. Eagle Mountain is the third largest city in Utah in terms of land mass and values conservation of natural resources in our community planning. www.eaglemountaincity.com

 

About Tyson Foods

Tyson Foods, Inc., (NYSE: TSN) is one of the world’s largest food companies and a recognized leader in protein. Founded in 1935 by John W. Tyson and grown under three generations of family leadership, the company has a broad portfolio of products and brands like Tyson®, Jimmy Dean®, Hillshire Farm®, Ball Park®, Wright®, Aidells®, ibp®, and State Fair®. Tyson Foods innovates continually to make protein more sustainable, tailor food for everywhere it’s available and raise the world’s expectations for how much good food can do. Headquartered in Springdale, Arkansas, the company had 121,000 team members at September 29, 2018. Through its Core Values, Tyson Foods strives to operate with integrity, create value for its shareholders, customers, communities and team members and serve as a steward of the animals, land and environment entrusted to it. Visit www.tysonfoods.com.

 

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Update – May 16, 2019

 

Redwood Road Paving – This Weekend

Redwood Road traffic has shifted to the west side of the road between Lake View Terrace Road and Village Parkway. Paving operations on the east side of the road will continue this weekend.

On Saturday, May 18, crews will pave through the following intersections: Pintail Avenue, Bliss Drive, Fairway Boulevard and Centennial Boulevard. Flaggers will stop traffic on these side streets to allow time for paving machinery to place and compact the asphalt, which can take approximately 20 minutes. Work hours will be from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Drivers should plan extra travel time and watch for flaggers on side streets. This work is weather-dependent.

Continuous Flow Intersection

Construction on the CFI is ongoing, and crews are working in multiple locations in the area. Drivers should be aware of traffic shifts and trucks moving in and out of the work zone.

 

What to Expect During Construction

▪ Noise, dust and vibration
▪ Night work as needed
▪ Lane shifts and closures
▪ Traffic delays
▪ Steel plates on roadway
▪ Traffic stopped on Redwood Road
▪ Large construction trucks entering/exiting work zone
▪ Water spraying in work zone for dust control

 

Hours of Operation

Daytime Hours
Monday through Friday (weekends as needed)
7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Nighttime Hours
Night work will happen as needed
8 p.m. to 7 a.m.

Construction activities and schedules are subject to change.

 

Contact Us

Hotline: 801-997-5682
Email: redwoodsaratoga@utah.gov
Website: udot.utah.gov/redwoodsaratoga

The Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) has installed new radar-equipped wildlife crossing signs along S.R. 73 (Wride Hwy) to make the highway safer for both drivers and animals. These signs are being placed in a one-mile section of the highway that has seen nearly 100 deer-related collisions in the past four years.
This is the first time UDOT has used radar-equipped signs to reduce wildlife collisions. The signs are equipped with LEDs that flash when deer are detected in the area.
Leslie Beck, UDOT’s Saratoga Springs maintenance station supervisor, saw radar-equipped signs for other applications at UDOT’s annual conference and thought that wildlife detection would be a good use for this technology. The manufacturer worked with UDOT to develop this new type of sign, which will be tested in this location and potentially installed in other areas.
 
Eagle Mountain City thanks our partners at UDOT for being proactive in looking for solutions to increase safety.

Update: Live-Fire Artillery Demonstration Cancelled

The live-fire artillery demonstration scheduled for May 15, from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at Camp Williams, was cancelled until further notice due to high winds.

If conditions become favorable for a live-fire demonstration, an update will be posted to our Twitter account: @UTNationalGuard

 

The Utah National Guard is scheduled to conduct a week-long artillery live-fire exercise in May at Camp Williams. Those expected to be most affected by these events are residents of Bluffdale, Riverton, Herriman, Eagle Mountain, Saratoga Springs and Lehi. The following dates and times of the life-fire events are approximate:

May 13-15, 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.

May 16, 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Media and Eagle Mountain residents that live along the border of Camp Williams are invited to view a live-fire artillery demonstration scheduled for May 15, from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. at the Camp Williams Tickville Gate, located at the North end of Mustang Way in Eagle Mountain. Because of limited parking in the neighborhood plan to arrive around 5:30 p.m. as space along the fence line could be limited. Utah National Guard leaders will be available for questions. Once the firing has completed a M109 Paladin self-propelled howitzer will be available to view up close. Part of the tactical scenario will include a key leader engagement with residents of Meadow Ranch, Valley View, North Ranch, and Spring Run neighborhoods from Eagle Mountain.

Please direct all questions via text or email to Maj. D.J. Gibb, 801-716-9063, ng.ut.utarng.list.pao@mail.mil.

 

Updated May 13, 2019 – Flaggers will be on Pony Express Parkway between Mid Valley Road and Lake Mountain Road, with lane closures and traffic shifts both north and south bound. The closure on the eastbound side between Sandpiper and South Ridge Road will remain in place until paving is completed.

Updated: May 3, 2019 – Paving work for the phase between South Ridge Rd and Sandpiper Rd has been delayed a bit due to settling of a trench over the existing water line. This should not affect the overall project timeline for completion.

 

The widening of Pony Express Parkway will affect traffic between Lake Mountain Road and the area of South Ridge Rd (west of Ranches Pkwy). Water line installation is also occurring. Work hours will be between 7 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. daily through August, with the intention to have the project finished before school starts barring any unforeseen issues.

Please watch for lane shifts and flaggers and plan for extra drive time. See the map link below for work areas/phases. Note the scheduled dates will be adjusted as work continues due to variable reasons for construction delays.

We appreciate your patience as we make these necessary improvements.

Overall Traffic Plan Schedule – Pony Express Widening

**UPDATE – 4/29** This project has been postponed for approximately two weeks. We will update when it is due to start again.

 

Due to construction activity for water infrastructure, lane shifts will be implemented starting tomorrow, April 25 in the area of the roundabout on Eagle Mountain Blvd at Pony Express Pkwy. See maps for details.

Work hours will be approximately 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and is expected to be completed by Tuesday, April 30.

Bird House Banner

Eagle Mountain City and the Eagle Mountain Arts Alliance are excited to announce a community art project that your family can contribute to. Residents are invited to pick up a free bird house kit from City Hall, decorate it, and then return it so that it can be included in a public art installation. Only 150 bird house kits are available, and only one bird house per family. The bird houses are easy to build, fun to decorate, and your family will be listed as contributors to the public art project.

How to Participate

  1. Go to Eagle Mountain City Hall located at 1650 E Stagecoach Run. Enter at the main south entrance.
  2. Tell the Receptionist that you are there to pickup a Bird House Kit. The Receptionist will ask for your name and contact info to record that your family has picked up a bird house.
  3. You will receive a Bird House Kit (including wood and nails), instructions and tips from the manufacturer, and information about the community art project.
  4. Take the kit home, build it, and decorate it with members of your family.
    1. You will need: Hammer, Pencil (for labeling if desired), and Paint or other art supplies for decorating the bird house.
    2. Note: Acrylic paint is recommended.
  5. Take some pictures, show it off, and then bring it back to City Hall within two weeks. We are hoping to piece together the art installation in the spring.

Once you’ve completed these steps, we will add your bird house to the public art installation and add your family’s name to a contribution plaque or sign that will be included in the installation.

 

Questions you may have

 

Why have a community Art Project?

Eagle Mountain City is a rapidly growing community that is growing so fast that it is lacking in some cultural staples such as public art. The Eagle Mountain Arts Alliance and Eagle Mountain City are teaming up to help invigorate the arts in the City, though the City’s role will take a back seat over time.

Why Bird Houses?

Our City already has a great relationship with the environment and the wildlife that share it with us. Bird Houses are a great medium that we can connect with, are inexpensive, and are easy to build and decorate.

How should I decorate my Bird House?

We are not looking for only expert artists to decorate bird houses. Anyone with any skill level can participate. We ask only that the decorations be meaningful to the community and family friendly.

What if I don’t have paint or other decoration supplies?

The Eagle Mountain Arts Alliance will be planning a build & decorate event that you can bring your bird house to. Additionally, see if family, friends, or neighbors can share paint, or you can pick up inexpensive acrylic paint at most major shopping centers.

Won’t birds that we are trying preserve like American Kestrels become confused with all of the additional bird houses?

No. These kits were specifically chosen for their quality construction and the size of the holes for birds. Kestrels and many other local bird species cannot fit in the holes of these bird houses. In fact, these bird houses are not intended to be used as actual homes for birds but only as an art installation. Smaller birds may still choose to call them home if the provided mesh screens are not used and that’s perfectly fine.

What is the purpose of the mesh screens?

The primary purpose is to prevent bees, wasps, or other insects out of the bird houses. It will prevent birds from accessing as well, but that is okay since these bird houses are intended as an art display, not to be regularly used by birds.

What if I want to keep my Bird House?

You can keep your bird house if you would rather not contribute to the public art installation. However, we really hope that you do bring them back so we can add it to the display. One benefit of bringing it back is that we will be doing our best to maintain the bird houses which means your bird house may last longer as part of the community art project.

Where will the Bird Houses go? And what will this Public Art Installation look like?

The bird houses will be collected and mounted onto treated wooden posts of varying heights, about 20-25 bird houses per post and installed in a public park. The City is working out the ideal location for the public art installation, but it will likely be a public park location where the bird houses can be shielded to some degree from our north/south winds, where there is plenty of public access, and where they can be kept safe from things like sporting events.