Eagle Mountain City is encouraging residents to stay mindful of traffic safety during the remainder of the summer months.

According to data, the period between Memorial Day and Labor day account for the 100 deadliest days on Utah roads. Year-to-date data indicate that 169 fatalities have occurred on Utah roads as of July 18.

Trends in traffic safety also indicate that impaired driving is increasing in the Beehive State and, according to the Utah Highway Patrol, nearly 3,500 citations have been issued for motorists traveling over 100 mph.

Eagle Mountain City works with the Utah County Sheriff’s Office Eagle Mountain division to provide traffic enforcement within city limits.

Keeping Eagle Mountain’s roads safe require motorists to take several steps. First, the City is asking residents to be considerate of speed limits, other motorists and where they are parking in designated lots or on City or neighborhood streets.

Further, the City is encouraging awareness of others on the road, including the possibility of ATVs and UTVs on City streets. Finally, residents are encouraged to report traffic safety issues to the Utah County Sheriff’s Office Eagle Mountain division and utilize the assistance of the City’s Neighborhood Improvement department for any parking-related issues.

Keeping Eagle Mountain’s roads safe is a top priority for the City. Motorists can help improve safety for themselves, their families and their neighbors by following these simple steps.

Eagle Mountain City is recommending residents irrigate their lawns in alignment with state recommendations.

Currently the City is recommending watering your lawn three times per week. This recommendation is created from moisture in the forecast and prevailing temperatures.

Eagle Mountain wants residents to be able to manage their lawns with the best information. Recently, the City took the time to update its water conservation web page. This resource helps residents find rebate programs, helpful lawn watering tips, stay in line with state recommendations and learn more about Utah’s ongoing drought. Visit the updated Water Conservation page here.

Eagle Mountain City has added new features and additional information for the events it hosts throughout the year to its website.

The newly revised events page allows residents to retrieve better information for major events such as Pony Express Days, Christmas Village, or the Turkey Trot. It also increases convenience by allowing residents to add events to their calendar and obtain directions to the event.

Vendors are also encouraged to watch this page for relevant sign-up information and use the page as a reference for planning services throughout the year.

Residents can take advantage of any of these free community events throughout the year.  

Eagle Mountain City announced its plans to hire a Wildlife Biologist and Environmental Planner in March.

The City, in cooperation with local wildlife advocates, is placing greater emphasis on the conservation of open spaces and the protection of wildlife. This new position is unique in the state of Utah and is designed to help facilitate dialogue with concerned community members while guiding the City in its development and decision-making process.

Todd Black, who was recently announced as the City’s hire for the position, brings many years of experience in wildlife research. Black has worked in outreach and education through Utah State University and has previously worked alongside private landowners and large corporations.

“As far as I know, this is the first time ever I’ve heard of a municipality hiring a wildlife biologist,” said Black.

Many residents have expressed an interest in the protection of wildlife in Eagle Mountain. As a result, the City will utilize this new position to advise around code enforcement, planning and development, and potential City Code amendments in future years.

Already, Eagle Mountain has made strides in the areas of conservation and development. The City was the first in the state of Utah to create a Wildlife Corridor Overlay Zone. This type of zoning allows for the protection of elk, pronghorn and mule deer migration patters through the Cedar Valley and acts in cooperation with private landowners to better consider the needs of these species.

“I think having somebody like myself in this position will help look at it from a new set of eyes,” said Black.

Eagle Mountain City continues to consider the possibility of an advisory group of residents to help advise the City in conservation matters. Please be sure to check out our Wildlife and Conservation web page to learn more about conservation in Eagle Mountain.

Windy conditions may have landed tumbleweeds on your property.  Disposing of them can be quite an undertaking. Here are a few reminders:

Residents have several options for removal, including:

-Flattening the tumbleweeds and disposing of them at a local landfill (the City provides two free dump passes per year available at Eagle Mountain City Hall)

-Burning the tumbleweeds in a burn barrel while staying mindful of potential dangers, including: structures, wind, and flammable materials. Residents should also avoid burning trash in burn barrels.

-Contacting the City in extreme and overwhelming cases to potentially provide resources, such as a dumpster, for removal through the Resident Portal (determinations made on a case-by-case basis by the Streets department). https://eaglemountaincity.com/portal/

If you notice tumbleweeds obstructing the roadway, please contact Eagle Mountain City. Our Streets department is happy to respond to road hazards.

Many public areas around Eagle Mountain are a great place to ride Off-Highway Vehicles (OHVs). These areas are part of what make Eagle Mountain a fun and unique place to live.

Staying safe with your OHV is not only important for keeping the community attractive, but it’s also important for the safety of the individuals riding.

The state of Utah and Eagle Mountain City have laws that govern the use of OHVs. Residents are encouraged to familiarize themselves with these codes by visiting Eagle Mountain City’s Trails web page here.

Parents are also being encouraged to talk to their kids about the possible dangers of OHV use.

When parents take time to tell their children that their safety is cared about and teenaged riders are comfortable respecting the safety of themselves and those in the community, we can keep making Eagle Mountain an amazing place to experience the outdoors.

Kids Computers

Eagle Mountain City has made a substantial commitment to invest in resident information and engagement. Among these services are the Resident Portal, Rumor Stop, What’s Happening and the Eagle Mountain City mobile app.

Residents are encouraged to engage with the City, ask questions, get issues resolved, and do so in a fast, easy, and convenient manner.

These services are designed to accommodate separate information needs within the community.

Resident Portal – Residents can report code violations, pay utilities, access the events calendar and find homeowner resources.

Rumor Stop – Residents can request an answer to their most persistent community questions. The City makes every attempt to answer these questions in an honest and timely manner with up-to-date information.

What’s Happening – Residents can track new residential, business, and road construction projects in Eagle Mountain. Project names and locations, regular updates, links to contact information for various projects, and more.

Eagle Mountain City App – Puts resident’s most frequently accessed services on their mobile devices.

Eagle Mountain continues to make strides to keep residents better informed. Residents can also follow City information on social media via Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Eagle Mountain City prides itself in its considering conservation and the preservation of wildlife in the City.

Given Eagle Mountain’s relatively high growth in recent years – adding more than 1,500 residential housing permits and thousands of new residents every year, the City wanted to make good on its promise to keep an open feel in Eagle Mountain while better considering the needs of the wildlife that call the Cedar Valley home.

The City’s Planning Department, when considering new business and residential development, regularly includes signoffs from the state and federal government when consider the impact new development has on streams, washes, and protected animal species.

To improve communication and increase accountability, Eagle Mountain City is now hiring for a Wildlife Biologist and Environmental Planner as part of its efforts to more heavily consider conservation.

The individual hired for this position will advise the City and discuss matters of concern with community stakeholders when new development plans to locate in Eagle Mountain.

This new, innovative approach sets Eagle Mountain apart when considering how the City of the future should plan for growth and expansion.

Not only will this position keep an open and rural feel in Eagle Mountain, the position will also alleviate constraints placed on developers as the potential for uncertainty and changing project timelines is alleviated.

Residents can learn more about Eagle Mountain City’s efforts to include conservation by following its social media pages.