Proposed Lower Hidden Valley site reviewed for development amendments

Posted by & filed under Business & Residential Development, News, Wildlife & Conservation.

An action item that came before the Eagle Mountain City Planning Commission this week is generating a response from affected residents.    The proposal amends the Lower Hidden Valley Master Development Plan in preparation for the construction of new residential dwelling units near Hidden Hollow Elementary School. The land developer hopes to begin construction as early… Read more »

Mule deer habitat remains diverse

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What constitutes mule deer habitat? Mule deer are adaptable to different food sources and living in different environments. If you asked mule deer biologists in the Sonoran Desert, they would tell you something completely different than someone in the panhandle of Idaho. As would someone from the Arizona strip, the Badlands of Montana/North Dakota, the… Read more »

Many slithery serpents call Cedar Valley home

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The thought of snakes can illicit some squeamish responses. Snakes, often get a bad rap. However, snakes play an important role in the functioning of local ecosystems. Here are the three most common snakes residents are likely to encounter here in Eagle Mountain: 1-Great Basin rattle snake (Crotalus, lutosus).  These rattle snakes are common in… Read more »

What does the fox say?

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Eagle Mountain is a wild-urban interface. The truth is, and this should be no surprise, the community has wild canids living within city limits. Likely, there’s an influx of migration and emigration of coyotes and red foxes moving through the city throughout the year.  It’s important that residents are aware of these and, like any… Read more »

Getting to know local birds

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Late summer, early fall and into the winter months is the time of year we see many of Utah’s summer migrant birds like the Swainson’s hawk, Bullocks oriole, barn swallow and western kingbird fly south to warmer latitudes.  These birds are primarily insect eaters, and with colder temperatures, there just isn’t a food source to… Read more »